Create a Mini Search Engine Website with the Squarespace Search Block

Taking inspiration from search engines like Answer the Public and the big dawg, Google itself, I attempted to turn my trial Squarespace website into a mini search engine.

Did it work? See for yourself.

Why You Should Organize your Content with Squarespace Tags & Categories

Here's Why You Should Use Squarespace Tags and Categories: You want your site visitors to find your products, services and blog posts easily. And you don't want them losing interest or getting frustrated as they navigate through your site.

3 Reasons Why I Wish Design in a Day Existed for My First Squarespace Website

You bit the bullet and signed up for a Squarespace account. Good for you. 

And, I'm guessing you did what many DIYers do - dove right in and started building your Squarespace site because...

WEBSITE. {Ding ding ding!}

Encourage your Website Visitors to Take Action with Page Goals.

Keep it Simple:  Prep for Your Squarespace Website Series
This blog post is the third in a 4-part series on how to prep your Squarespace website before you fiddle around with the tech side of it all.

Set Specific Goals for your Squarespace website Pages

If you've been following along in this series, then you should have already:

You’re keeping it simple because you know that your website will grow and shift with your business. That’s the beauty of using Squarespace - once you know how to use it, it’s easy to make changes so that your website stays fresh and up to date.

Here are the next 2 steps to preparing your Squarepace website before you even log in.

Step 1

Decide on the goal for each one your pages.

Step 2

Decide one main call to action for each page.

What is a call to action?
A call to action is something you ask your website visitor to do such as

  • sign up for your newsletter
  • click a link to another page or blog article
  • get in touch with you by filling in a short form.

Don't spend too much time at this stage in your web build process figuring out what your site visitors will and should do.


Simply decide on a page goal, add a call to action and watch how your visitors behave over a couple of months. Tweak your pages if needed based on your visitors behaviours.

 

We interrupt this blog post to let you go play.

 

Listen, you still don’t need to log into your Squarespace account to do these 2 steps. But, I get it, you’re eager to dive right in. Go for it, if you really want to. Nothing like hands on learning, imo.

Here's a tip if you want to dive right in:

1. Copy and paste in Cupcake Ipsum text 
2. Use Squarespace’s default images or grey blocks for your "images."

By doing this, you'll get a feel for how the platform works. If you're trying to learn the Squarespace platform AND be all creative with words, you'll get frustrated. Don't do that.

 

Did you go and play for awhile? That’s ok. Thanks for coming back.

 
 

What are the 4 or 5 most important pages on your Squarespace website?

That depends on your business.

We’ll use my website as an example, since you’re already here.
 

UPDATE: Since writing these posts, my website navigation has changed but the advice stays the same (and I've even followed my own advice!) 

 

My top 4 pages are:

Home page
(Note: it’s a long scrolling page, so we’ll look at just the top section)

  • Goal: encourage Squarespace web designers to sign up for my newsletter
     
  • Call to Action: a newsletter sign up form with a free opt in (a sample word count cheatsheet)

 
About Page

  • Goal: Find out about me and the benefits to working with me
     
  • Call to Action: Text Links to my Work with Me pages so potential clients can find out more about what I do.


Work with Me
(Drop Down Menu - two pages - one for Squarespace web designers & another for service-based entrepreneurs)

  • Goal for each page: Find out more about the benefits of my services and how I can help
     
  • Call to action for each page:
    -For Squarespace web designers, get in touch with me.

    - For entrepreneurs and freelancers, click the link to the Design in a Day service page on Sarah Moon’s website. Sarah's a fab and expert Squarespace web designer I’m collaborating with to help entrepreneurs with quick website launches. 
     

Blog Page

  • Goal: Read my Blog Posts
     
  • Call to Action: I break my own rule of one main call to action per page - my blog page has several calls to action including linking to specific posts, following me on Pinterest, searching blog topics, or checking the archives.
 

 
 

 

Now it’s your turn.

Start by writing down your page goals and calls to action that a visitor can take on each page.

One more thing - I get that it can be hard to visualize how your website will look. It’s hard to outline things without “seeing” them first - and that’s why you want to get into your Squarespace account and start playing.

One way to'fight this urge'to set up your website before your content is ready is to search for inspirational Squarespace websites and templates and pin them or bookmark them to refer to later.

Stick to the plan!

  • Write down a page goal for each page.
     
  • Write down a main call to action that visitors can take on each page.

Let's recap.

Here are all the steps you should take before you start building your Squarespace website. 

  1. Decide who your ideal website visitor is (aka potential client or customer)
  2. Decide what the main goal of your website is?
  3. Decide what pages you want in the main navigation (up to 5).
  4. Create a visual sitemap of your website.
  5. Write down a page goal for each page.
  6. Write down a main call to action that visitors can take on each page.

Keep it simple. 


{Pssst}
Are you keeping all this information in one place? In a notebook, a Google Drive folder?  If not, do that.


Need to launch a website like
RIGHT NOW
and no time to learn Squarespace?
 

Try out Design-in-a-Day, my collaboration with Squarespace expert and web designer Sarah Moon. 
 

We'll snap together a polished website based on a Squarespace template that you choose or we recommend. This is a quick and efficient process to get you online in time for that big opportunity that demands a solid online presence.


Kath O'Malley Copywriting and Squarespace Services

Hi, I’m Kath - author of this blog post (and others like it) and copywriter, editor, keyword researcher and website setter upper for Squarespace web designers and service-based entrepreneurs and freelancers. Team up with me to get your web design projects done, like yesterday. 
 

 

2 Reasons why you should create a Visual Site Map for your Squarespace Website

 
 

Keep it Simple:  Prep for Your Squarespace Website Series
This blog post is the second in a 4-part series on how to prep your Squarespace website before get into all the techy stuff.

 

Why You Need a Visual Sitemap for your Squarespace Website

 

Have you logged into your Squarespace account yet and started editing some pages.

Yes? I don’t blame you. It’s fun. It’s frustrating. It’s intuitive. It’s crazy-making. It’s all those things.

It’s time to stop playing around.


Instead, head back over to your boring old Google doc or Word doc or chicken scratch notepad or where ever you wrote down your website goal.

You did decide on your main website goal, right?

 

Not yet? Then read how to set your website goals first, then come back.

You’re back now? Good.

Remember, we’re keeping it simple. You already have a service-based business, you’ve got a roster of clients and customers and it’s time you had a decent website.  

Step 1 (is done):

You have a goal for your Squarespace website.

Step 2:

Brainstorm! Decide what pages you want on your website. 

(Keep in mind that your website will grow as your business grows, so you don’t need to get all ambitious - unless you really want to.)

In that notepad or Google doc, write down all the pages you want. How many is that?

Step 3:

From that list of pages you want, what are the absolute must-have pages you'll add to your main navigation?

(The main navigation are the links at the top of your website that visitors have access to no matter what website page they are on. Or, if on mobile, the ‘hamburger’ stack.)
 

 
Responsive Hamburger Menu in Squarespace
 

UPDATE: Things have changed around here...but I don't have time at the moment to rewrite this post. My apologies! My must-have navigation pages have changed from the ones listed below.

In my case, my must-have navigation pages are:

  • a Home Page (long scrolling page called Squarespace Designer Partner)
  • an About Page
  • a Services Page which I call ‘Work with Me’ (it's actually a drop down menu with 2 pages - and one link leads to my Design in a Day collaborator's website!)
  • a Blog page.

 

What are the main navigation pages you want on your Squarespace website?

 

 
 

 

Next: 2 Reasons why you should create a visual sitemap for your Squarespace Website.

 

A visual sitemap is basically a flow chart for your website. Here are 2 reasons why you should have one.

1. A visual sitemap will help you organize your website

Start with the main navigation pages, then add interior pages if required.

 

 
Have you noticed the change? Time to do another sitemap, I think.

Have you noticed the change? Time to do another sitemap, I think.

 

 

Remember, keep it simple. How many pages do you really need if you’re just getting started on Squarespace? (Hint: Start with the pages that will bring you clients and customers.)

 

As you create your visual site map, always remind yourself: what is the website's main goal?

Keep in mind how each page - which will have its own goals - can serve your website's main goal as well.

2. A Visual Sitemap will help you remember what pages go where if you rebuild your site or move pages around

Julienne Desjardins explains why you should have a visual site map - scroll down to point 4. (I agree).

I also like the look of the free tool Bubbl.us for creating a visual sitemap. I use Google Docs and draw by hand, but this looks easier to use.

Let's recap.

Here are all the steps you should take before you start building your Squarespace website. 

  1. Decide who is your ideal website visitor (aka potential client or customer)
  2. Decide what is the main goal of your website?
  3. Decide what must have pages you'll have in the main navigation (up to 5)
  4. Create a visual sitemap of your starter website.

Keep it simple. 


Need to launch a website
like RIGHT NOW
& no time to learn Squarespace?

Try out Design-in-a-Day, my collaboration with Squarespace expert and web designer Sarah Moon. We'll snap together a polished website based on a Squarespace template that you choose or we recommend. 

This is a quick and efficient process to get you online in time for that big opportunity that demands a solid online presence.

 
 

 
 
Kath O'Malley Squarespace Web Designer Partner

Hi, I’m Kath - author of this blog post (and others like it) and copywriter, editor, keyword researcher and website setter upper for Squarespace web designers and service-based entrepreneurs and freelancers. Team up with me to get your web design projects done, like yesterday.

Click the button below to get in touch.

 
 

 
 
 

You've Decided to Build your Website on Squarespace. Now What?

You’ve bought your domain and signed up for a Squarespace account.

Now what?

The Now What is simple. What do you want your website to ‘do’ for your business?

Choose a goal for your Squarespace Website.

7 Steps to Adding Targeted Keywords to a Squarespace Blog Post

 
Add a Targeted Keyword to a Squarespace Blog Post
 
 

The other day, after doing some SEO keyword research work for one of my fab web designer clients, Sarah Moon (check her out!) - I decided to see where my site ranked in Google search results for the keyword Squarespace.

I used the site Where Do I Rank.

It was somewhat depressing.

 
Without Squarespace Blog posts www.kathomalley has a NA Google Search Result Rank.
 

Out of 38,600,000, my ranking was N/A.

And yet, I have been noticing a wee trend in my Squarespace analytics - some visitors are finding me via Google (and some have even contacted me after a Google search! Woohoo!) 

So I decided to test my rank again.

I entered a keyword that I used in a previous Squarespace blog post.

 

I entered the (longtail) keyword: Duplicate Page Squarespace

Now how about that?

I rank number 6, on the first page.

 
Google Search Result Page for one of my Squarespace Blog Posts.
With Duplicate Squarespace Page my Squarespace Blog Post Ranks #6.
 

Just to be on the safe side, I tried another keyword rank checker at SEOCentro

Still #6!

 
My Rank for Squarespace Blog Post Keyword Duplicate Squarespace Page is Still #6.
 
 

What's a Longtail Keyword, by the way?

A Longtail Keyword is 3 - 4 words or a descriptive phrase. If I understand correctly, up to 70% of searches use a long tail keyword. (But don't quote me on that.) 

I'm no SEO expert. I simply try to follow Squarespace's SEO suggestions and that of more experty experts - which, among other things, is to blog.

 
Blogging involves updating your site frequently, which helps search engines see it as an active site. Even if you’re a business and not a blogger, adding a Blog Page and updating it regularly with relevant content could potentially benefit your SEO while building your brand.
— Squarespace Tutorial Support
 
 

Writing How To and Other Squarespace Blog Posts brings me site visitors.

Blogging is what makes my site dynamic and brings me the right kind of visitors. (I think, anyway).

But it's not just the blogging, it's the keywords I use in the blog posts and where I put them.

Here are the places I put keywords in my blog posts (these days).

  • Title
  • Headings
  • Body (the actual post)
  • The image File Names & File Title Names
  • The Blog Post URL

Starting today, I'm also going to use the excerpt field and put the keyword in there. Squarespace excerpts usually show up in Google Search Results.

 
Add a Keyword to Excerpt Field of a Squarespace Blog Post.
 

Most of my blog posts are Squarespace How Tos and a lot of potential clients (even Squarespace web designers, my niche), google how to do stuff on Squarespace. The more I post, the more I should rank up there with the Big Dawgs, even if my main site never makes it to the top.

Going forward, my goal is to follow these 7 steps every time I write a How to Do Something in Squarespace Blog Post:

  1. Pick a keyword (or phrase)
  2. Use the keyword in the Title
  3. Use the keyword in Headings
  4. Use the keyword in the Body of the Squarespace Blog Post (see what I did there?)
  5. Ensure all my image titles include the keyword and add it to the File Name Field when I upload an image
  6. Include the keyword in an Excerpt
  7. Use the keyword in the post URL.

Basically, I'm doing this....

 
Add a Targeted Keyword to Squarespace Blog Post Infographic
 

Want a copy of the above ever-so-fancy Infographic to stick on the wall next to your computer so you don't forget? (Hey, don't laugh. I have to do this.)

 

Just click the button below to download.

 
 

How to Make your Embedded Facebook Live Videos Mobile-friendly-ish

Mobile Responsive Embedded Facebook Videos in Squarespace

The other day a fellow entrepreneur who uses Squarespace popped in on my Facebook Page to ask about how to make embedded Facebook Videos on Squarespace mobile-friendly.

It dawned on me, dang, I never actually checked mobile to see how the videos looked. I assumed, wrongly, they were mobile responsive.

They were not.

 
See - the video width is cropped. Had no idea!

See - the video width is cropped. Had no idea!

 

 

First, before you continue reading this post, if you don't know how to embed a Facebook Live and regular FB video in a Squarespace page, read this post first

Then come back!

I didn't (and still don't) have a whole ton of time to find the solution but as a determined-to-figure-stuff-out elementary HTMLer & CSSer, I went in search of an answer anyway.

Let me admit right here that I'm more of a copy and paste coder. I know that there's got to be some code out there that will work and if I pinpoint it just right, I'll find the answer.

I did. 

Sort of.

The trick, apparently, is to set the width view in the code at 100% rather than pixels. (Mine was at 560).  Here's a picture of the embed code where I change it from 560 to 100%.

 
Make Embedded Facebook Video in Squarespace Mobile Responsive
 

Here's where the 'sort of' solved it comes in. The width now looks good in mobile, but the height doesn't work. I tried height at 100% and Auto, but the video ended up cropped midway. I've kept height at 400 so there's a padding issue. (I think it's a padding issue).

Embed Facebook Video in Squarespace Height Issue

But you know what, I'm ok with that for now. Having said that, if anyone has the answer PLEASE PLEASE share it with us over on Facebook in the post where the discussion is already taking place.

We will forever be in your debt. Or at least very very grateful.


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My Ideal Work Week - What's Yours?

 

+ Customizing Colours in Squarespace

Ideal Week and Customizing Colours in Squarespace
 

Last week I had that problem I shouldn't ever 'complain' about. Work. Lots of it. Coming at me from left and right and centre. 

I even had two full sitting-at-desk days - almost like a full time - in-an-office job. Took two 15- minute breaks and a half hour lunch. Yowza.

What else?

In my inbox, I found two Work with Me Requests. (Yay!)

Also had some admin stuff to deal with.

And bills to pay.

And kids hungry for snacks. And cuddles. And stories. And wha??? Another snack??

So I didn't blog.

My 4 batched posts were all used up in the previous 4 weeks.

Oooph.

If there's one thing I've been this year, it's I've been diligent with blogging once a week, mainly about Squarespace.

I knew that it was time to dust off my IDEAL WORK WEEK calendar.

It's in a spreadsheet. It's colour-coded but otherwise, not all that pretty. 

Check Out My Ideal Work Week in a Handy Screenshot

 
Click the image to expand / download it - no opt in required.

Click the image to expand / download it - no opt in required.

 

Now the key word is Ideal. Life gets in the way. (Halloween, for example, and last minute candy shopping.) Actual work also gets in the way.

But, I did manage to follow this ideal week for all of about 3 weeks before the summer and let me tell you - I was super efficient.

Like astonishingly efficient.

So it's time to get back at this again to see if it helps me feel like I'm on top of things.

(For the record - Monday from 5 - 6 am is blog / newsletter brainstorm, editorial, batching time - and I'm doing it. In 15 minutes. This post will be scheduled for tomorrow.)

Squarespace tip: How to change colours in Design -> Style Editor section.

Recently (not really sure when, one day, I just noticed it was different), Squarespace changed how you customize colours in the Design -> Style Editor section.

The colour code defaults are hsla (or is it rgba?) 

Anyway ... not HEX!

 
rgba color code Squarespace
 

There's probably a very sound designy reason for this, but as a non-designer, I was all - GAK! Way back, I created a wee brand guide for my biz and it's all only in hex colours. I also use Canva for my graphics. Also hexy.

In one of the Squarespace Facebook groups I belonged to, someone asked about Hex to HSLA and I suggested they try this colour converter which has helped me:  Hex to HSLA.

An even better tip for changing color. 

All you have to do is pop in your hex numbers in the field and it works just fine.

Check it out (and thank you Kaitlyn Fox of Crown Fox for this tip, from all us DIYers).

 
Remember to use the # before the hex number or it won't work.

Remember to use the # before the hex number or it won't work.

PS If you're wondering what all this colour code stuff is all about, this explanation in the HTML Color Codes site is pretty good.

Click Squarespace Changing Colours tutorial for more info. (Oops, colors, I'm Canadian, sorry, yep, sorry, Canadian there too).

 
 

 

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3 Key Benefits to Writing Your Squarespace Page Descriptions ...

 

...before you build your website.

 
3 Benefits to Writing your Squarespace page descriptions before Building your Website

I'm going to make a couple of assumptions here before I share the 3 key benefits to writing your Squarespace page descriptions.

ASSUMPTION 1
You're about to build your client's (or your own) Squarespace website. Maybe you've even started.

ASSUMPTION 2
You (or your client) have written and rewritten and edited ALL your web copy. All of it. (Ok, most of it.) And your images are perfect. They're resized and ready to upload.

You just want to GO. Get that website done.

Hang on! It's time to write keyword-rich page descriptions

Don't leave this till later. Learn from my past (and current) mistakes. 

Adding keyword-rich page descriptions to your Squarespace pages is something search engines like THE Google pick up on.

In some cases, Google will surface the description in search results so, according to Squarespace, keep your page descriptions to 160 characters. Think Twitter(ish).

(Note: sometimes these page descriptions overlay your banner image and allow you to add a Call to Action button. In this case, you may not want to add a search engine-friendly page description.

Test out your template first, find out if page descriptions can be hidden in the Style Editor of the Design section - if that's what you want. In my current template, Pacific, my page descriptions are hidden when pages are nested in an Index.)

What are the 3 Key Benefits to Writing Page Descriptions before Building a Squarespace Website?

 

1. You'll have a ready-made list of keywords related to your business.

When you write a page description, it needs to be readable, user-friendly and include industry-specific or niche keywords. This is something I need to do for my own site (ahem) but I have researched keywords and written page descriptions for web designer clients and other entrepreneurs

If you've already written your web copy, you should have a list of essential keywords that can be sprinkled throughout your site - in a natural <Squarespace> way <Web Designer>, of course <Copywriter>. 

Ok that was cheesy.

Cheesy is not a keyword for me, by the way.

Here are a few FREE places to find keywords for your page descriptions and web copy.

Keyword Tool
Google Keyword Planner
Google Trends
And then there's THIS GUY of Answer the Public fame. (Type Squarespace in the search field, then click the Get Answers button. It's brilliant. Not only keywords, you'll also get a bunch of cool blog titles.)

 

2. You don't put off writing page descriptions or forget about it all together.

What more can I say here. You just get the job done. Then all you have to do is copy and paste your page descriptions into the page description field in your page configuration settings.

Here's the page description for my about page. (Confession time: I just typed it in right now!)

 
Squarespace Page Description About Page
 
 

3. You'll optimize your site for SEO (Search Engine Optimization). 

Ok, I don't really like writing about SEO because it's a big ole topic best left to the experts.

The SEO checklist from Hoot Design Co is perfect because they share actionable, site-wide SEO tips specifically for small biz owners and freelancers with Squarespace websites. Go check out their blog post. It tells you everything you need.

Any Qs or comments, head on over to my FB page and keep the conversation going over there.

 

 

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Check out these related blog posts about writing copy for your Squarespace website.

 
 
 

1 Common Mistake Newbie Squarespacers Make

1 Common Mistake Newbie Squarespacers Make with Images

Those images you are using for your Squarespace website. They're too big. The file size is huge (1 MB, no no no!) They're all shapes and sizes.

Getting them right can be such a pain in the bum.

Whether you've taken a selfie, a fancy pic with your fancy camera, downloaded free images from Unsplash or bought some from Creative Market, you've got to get the size right.

Remember these two numbers: 1500px and 500kb (or less).

Write them down somewhere. Like on a Post-it note and stick it on your computer or laptop.

Squarespace best practices for Images

  • Your ideal image width should be 1500px which Squarespace will responsively resize for you depending on your layout and the device your visitors are using.
  • Your ideal image file size should be 500kb or less.

If you're wondering why your site is loading so slowly, check your image file sizes.

If you're wondering why there's white space around your blog post or page image, check the image width. You can also stretch the image to fit the image block container but be aware that it might distort or look blurry. Test it out. See what works.

This Pinterest Friendly Blog Graphic (735 px x 1102 px) is NOT stretched.

 
Not stretched
 

This Pinterest-friendly Blog Graphic (735 px x 1102 px)  is stretched.

I don't see much of a difference, do you?

 
testing stretch images in Squarespace.
 

Here's how to stretch your images, by the way.

(Ah, now this one below is stretched and kind of blurry.)

Step 1: Click on the sideways teardrops and choose Image Block.
Step 2: Upload your picture
Step 3: Click on Stretch, then click apply. Your image will stretch to fill the image block container.

 
Stretch image in Squarespace Image Block
 

Great, I need to optimize my images for Squarespace. Now what?

I use TinyPNG to reduce my image file sizes. It's quick, easy, and free. You can use whatever software works best for you. 

For banner images, make sure the width is 1500px, like Squarespace suggests.

For blog post images, I'm slack and don't worry about it so much. I mainly use screenshots in my posts for how to articles. I admit, I need to improve how I size and stretch them. Uh huh.

My main blog post graphic is Pinterest-friendly with these measurements: 735 px x 1102 px. Random but it works (and looks good on Pinterest) so I won't be changing that one.

When I work with web designer clients and entrepreneurs, I often resize images. I also teach clients how to optimize their images correctly so that this issue doesn't crop up later when they're managing their own sites.

The job can be tedious, but it makes all the difference. 

Have you had issues with the way your images look on Squarespace? Is your site loading slowly? Hop on over to my Facebook page and tell me what's going on with your images. That's where I like to talk about hacks that work.

 

 

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2 Images I Wish I Had created before Building My Squarespace Website

Squarespace Favicon Social Sharing Logo

Nothing like diving right in to build your new Squarespace website. You're eager. You love the look and feel of the platform, you just want to get started. (Or get your client's site started)

Right?

Believe me, I did it.  Twice actually. The second time was when I decided to go freelance and help web designers and entrepreneurs build Squarespace websites and write web copy. I rewrote and redesigned my website.

So here's the deal, you build the site, fiddle around, rewrite copy, edit copy, rewrite it again, move it around, add your images and finally you get your website looking and sounding the way you want.

(And maybe it really did take you only a day...sucks in cheeks.) 

But...Time for the nitty gritty. The settings, the extras. The piddly but important bits.

You need a favicon image and a social sharing logo image.

You're tired.

Your eyes hurt.

You've been on the computer all day.

You'll add those images later. 

(And then you'll forget (like I did). And then you'll wonder why there's no pretty image to go with your Facebook post when you type your URL or why the little tiny image in your browser tab is a black box.)

Listen to someone who still has to redo hers (someday).

Do it now.

Especially if you're reading this blog post BEFORE you've started building a Squarespace website. Prep the favicon and social sharing logo images, just like you prep your web copy and regular images before design your website. (You're prepping your copy & regular images in advance, I hope.)

Get that job out of the way now.

How to create Favicon and Social Sharing Logo Images for Squarespace.

  1. Your Favicon displays at 16px x 16px but the best size for the original image is between 100px x 100px and 300 px x 300px.
  2. Your Social Sharing Logo should be 200px x 200 px, but you may have to experiment with it as Facebook often changes their image size preferences. As of this post, mine doesn't render nicely when I post my URL in a regular Facebook post, but it looks ok in a reply to someone else's post.
  3. To upload your photos, click over to Home --> Design--> Site Title & Logo.
  4. Adding both a Favicon and Social Sharing logo is super simple and uploads just like a regular image in a blog post or page on Squarespace.
    Here's how to upload a Favicon.
    Here's how to upload a Social Sharing Logo.

Once you've done this, you may have to refresh your page, log out of Squarespace, clear your browser cache and use Facebook Debugger Tool (I'll do a post on that some other day!), so that these images show up.

For Qs or comments, the conversation takes place over on my FB page. I'll help you troubleshoot any issues you may have.

FAVICON & SOCIAL SHARING LOGO UPDATE

I was inspired by this batched and scheduled blog post to redo my Squarespace Favicon and Social Sharing Logo. 

Gotta admit, I don't love them and will probably change them again, but the kids will wake up soon and it's time to make breakfast and school lunches. All that.

The process:  

  1. 'Designed' the images in Canva -->  Each 300px x 300px. 
  2. Uploaded them to Squarespace in the Design-->Site Title & Logo Section.
  3. Cleared my Browser Cache and quit Chrome (as the new Favicon didn't surface immediately.) When I reopened my browser, the KO favicon appeared.
 
Upload Favicon and Social Sharing Logo to Squarespace
 

Using Facebook Debugger Tool for the Social Sharing Logo

Next, I 'debugged' my website so that when I post my website (not blog posts, just the website) to Facebook, it will pull up the new social sharing logo. Here are the steps in images:

 
Step 1 - Type your URL into the field and click the Debug button.

Step 1 - Type your URL into the field and click the Debug button.

 
 
Step 2 - Click the Scrape Again button if you don't see your new Social Sharing Logo. You might have to do that a couple of times.

Step 2 - Click the Scrape Again button if you don't see your new Social Sharing Logo. You might have to do that a couple of times.

 
 
Step 3 - Test how your Social Sharing Logo looks on your Facebook wall or Page. Remember to click the 'ONLY YOU" privacy option to hide this test from your friends. (Unless you want them to see it.)

Step 3 - Test how your Social Sharing Logo looks on your Facebook wall or Page. Remember to click the 'ONLY YOU" privacy option to hide this test from your friends. (Unless you want them to see it.)

 
 

 

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Why I Joined International Batching Day - Yes, It's a Real Day.

Joining Melissa Cassera's International Batching Day

I was on a bus going from Saskatoon to Regina the other day catching up on newsletters from all my favourite entrepreneurs when I stumbled on Melissa Cassera's International Batching Day email.

What's this?

Why, it's a chance for a group of eager entrepreneurs to spend a full day (or as long as you want) writing blog, web or any kind of copy or content in batches. 

In other words, get a big chunk of your biz writing or content creation done all at once.

I signed up immediately.

And lo (yes, I said 'lo') - Today is the big day. 

September 29, 2016. International Batching Day.

It's timely.

Had I batched last week, say, I would have had my Tuesday post scheduled and out in time. But, you see, these days, when it comes to working ON my biz, I leave things to the last minute, so, whipping up a how to do something cool in Squarespace blog post (and video and graphic) early Tuesday mornings is my modus operandi.

Yep, I admit. 

But, I was visiting a friend and then on a 3-hour bus ride and then...kids.  You know. Excited to see you. Gotta pay attention to the wee creatures. All that.

So there was no blog post on Tuesday.

Or Wednesday.

But there is one today and I promise you, there will be 5 scheduled in the weekly blog post queue (ok 4, well...maybe 3 - I'll tell you at the bottom because I'm going to crank out the drafts first before I hit publish on this one. Plus I have to make a Pinterest-friendly graphic - yikes, another thing I need to batch!)

Stay tuned.... (ding ding ding, the timer is a-going)

Alright I'm back. And I wrote this blog post and scheduled 3 other blog posts until Oct 18, 2016. All I need to do is add screenshots, Pinterest-y graphics and proofread.

That's 4 blog posts.

Pfew. I can relax. 

Blog Batching for International Batching Day with Melissa Cassera
 

This was my process.

1. Wrote a goal / purpose for my blog posts.
The goal is this: {subtly but not so subtly} encourage readers to click over to my Work with Me pages for Web Designers and Entrepreneurs. I'll be measuring this to see how many potential clients get in touch after these 4 blog posts are published. (A future blog post perhaps?)

2. Check My Current Editorial Calendar
I chose not to write the posts that are currently listed (with dates and all) because my goal has changed for this 'batch.' 

3. Read over my 'Swipe file' of Blog Headline templates
This included checking several posts that I have saved in my Social Media Pinterest Board.

4. Begin Writing. And writing. And writing.
And Scheduling. And Tagging. And Categorizing. And Finally Doing 1 PInterest Graphic - for this post.

And now it's time for lunch. (And maybe a quick proofread before I hit publish.)

Have any Qs or comments. Pop on over to my FB page - that's where I like to chitter chatter most.

 

 
 
 

Want to Duplicate or Copy the Form Block in Squarespace? Try this.

 
Duplicate a Squarespace Form Block
 

Recently, I changed the design of the Work with Me pages of my website: For Web Designers and For Entrepreneurs & Freelancers.

One of the changes included putting the client intake forms on their own web pages rather than having the form pop up in light box mode. (Is that a good idea, we'll see?)

If you're not sure what I'm blathering on about, bear with me and keep scrolling. I show the difference at the bottom of this post.

At this time, you can't copy or duplicate a form within a page or from one page to another. Kind of irritating, truth be told. 

Have you ever built a Squarespace form?

They're handy. Useful. Totally customizable. Can be used for questionnaires, contact forms, client intakes, surveys, testimonials. You name it. 

But building a Squarespace form can be pain in the butt. Especially if you can't reuse it on another page. 

So what's the solution? Code is apparently one way. But let's not go there.

The other solution is:

  • duplicate the page the form you want to copy is on,
  • delete all the content blocks on that page except the form
  • design the new page around the form.

Does that even make sense?

This how to Duplicate a Squarespace Form video should help.

 
 

(If you have any questions about this video, head on over to to my Facebook Page and ask away there.)

So, in case you're wondering - what's the difference between the form on the page and the pop up light box mode?

Here's what a form on a Squarespace page (or blog post) looks like using the default settings.

 
Name *
Name
 
 

Here's what a Form in Light Box Mode looks like using the default settings.

 
 

(To set this up, in the Form Block, click Advanced --> Scroll Down --> Enable Light Box Mode --> Type the text into the Open Button Label field.)


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